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Local Indivisible groups build and wield power in ways that individuals can’t. To create change, you need the collective constituent power that comes with working together, as Indivisibles.

Indivisibles organize -- which means building power and flexing at key moments. Indivisible Groups take action in their communities, build collective purpose, and create change.

We make calls. We show up. We organize. And we’ve built lasting collective power across the country, in our home towns. We’re Indivisible.

We’re a grassroots movement of thousands of local Indivisible groups with a mission to elect progressive leaders, rebuild our democracy, and defeat the Trump agenda.

Taking Action in Solidarity with Black Lives

Just the Calls to Action

1. Call your local officials and tell them to defund your local police department and invest those funds in resources people need, especially for Black communities, Indigenous communities, and communities of color. This is in support of the asks of local Black-led organizations like Reclaim the Block and national Black-led organizations like Movement for Black Lives, which are demanding that local governments commit to cutting funding for the police and investing it in Black community-led education, health and safety programs (such as funding for schools and youth homelessness services, solutions to the opioid crisis, and non-police responders for crises such as mental health response teams and community violence prevention programs). You can use this tool from Common Cause to get the contact info for your local officials.

2. Donate to and support these Black-led organizations (you can use this page to split a donation)Some local Minneapolis organizations, including Reclaim the Block and Black Visions Collective, have requested that donors contribute to other Minnesota-based groups listed in the Google Doc here.

3. Pursue your own anti-racist education with these resources: Anti-Racism Resources for White PeopleWhite Privilege: Unpacking the Invisible Knapsack by Peggy McIntoshQualified Immunity: Explained, and The Movement for Black Lives’ Policy Platform.

4. Demand your members of Congress end the 1033 program in the 2021 National Defense Authorization Act. The 1033 program grants authority to the Department of Defense to transfer defense materials and high grade weapons to local law enforcement agencies. These weapons are often used against Black and brown communities and, as we’ve recently seen, protestors. The NDAA is an annual must-pass piece of legislation, so we have a real chance to make this happen. Call your members of Congress and demand they end the 1033 program and prevent local law enforcement from getting their hands on dangerous weapons that could harm the public. 

5. Ask your local, state, and federal officials to donate any police union campaign donations that they have received to bail funds and mutual aid organizations and to publicly commit to rejecting these funds in the future. Call, email, and tweet at them. (See this tweet from New York State Senator Mike Gianaris here)

On May 25, George Floyd, a 46-year-old Black man, was murdered by Derek Chauvin, a white Minneapolis police officer. Chauvin kneeled on Floyd’s neck for seven minutes, suffocating him as Floyd pleaded repeatedly that he couldn’t breathe. Videos of the murder went viral with many noting the devastating similarities between Floyd’s killing and that of Eric Garner in 2014. In response, Minneapolitans took to the streets to protest both Floyd’s death and the long legacy of anti-Black racism and police violence in the city and in our nation. 

We believe it is critical that local police officials and district attorneys investigate, arrest, and prosecute any officers who commit murder and violate people’s human rights. While the four officers responsible for Floyd’s death have all been fired and charged for their actions, we know justice has not yet been achieved for Floyd, Breonna Taylor in Louisville, Tony McDade in Tallahassee, and so many others.

Protests have persisted and expanded to other parts of the country, despite police using extreme force and brutality to try to “dominate the streets.” Polce have tear-gassed protestors, shot them with rubber bullets, and met them with disproportionate use of force. 

Ignited by the protests in Minneapolis, people across the global community are taking to the streets demanding justice and an end to the attacks on Black communities. Protestors are fighting long-standing systematic oppression, the recent killings of Black people, and white supremacists who refuse to give up power. These protests will ignite a radical necessary change to policing in this country.

The recent murders that led to this moment

Tragically, George Floyd’s murder came on the heels of other heinous killings of Black people. On March 13, Breonna Taylor was murdered by Louisville police. The police entered her apartment without announcing themselves and shot her at least eight times. The FBI is now investigating the shooting.

In February, Ahmaud Arbery was murdered by two white vigilantes while he was on a run in south Georgia. Local police covered up the murder, claiming Ahmaud was involved in a burglary, and let Ahmaud’s killers go free. After video surfaced showing Ahmaud’s gruesome murder, the investigation was reopened. 

More murders have occurred since George Floyd was killed. On May 29, Tony McDade, a Black trans man, was murdered by Tallahassee police. According to witnesses, Tony was gunned down by police without warning. The senseless killings of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, Tony McDade, and many other shameless acts of police brutality this month and for centuries leading up to now compel us to speak out against ongoing racial injustice. 

While these deaths are horrific, they’re not unique. America’s police and criminal justice systems are the legacies of our country’s white supremacist, slave-owning history. Structural racism persists across every facet of American life and is perhaps most evident in the way that law enforcement interacts with communities of color. All across the country, Black people are more likely to be harassed, arrested, and killed by police than their white counterparts. 

We have a national crisis of white supremacist violence against Black people in this country. In the past 10 years alone, we witnessed the deaths of thousands of Black people at the hands of police. Breonna Taylor, Michael Brown, Eric Garner, Sandra Bland, and Philando Castile are just some of the names of those we’ve lost to racialized police violence. And the COVID-19 pandemic has only created more opportunities for police to question and detain Black people. In New York City, for example, from March 16 to May 5, over half of the summonses issued related to social distancing enforcement were issued to Black residents even though they make up only a quarter of the city’s residents.

One of the key ways to limit police violence in the future is by decreasing funding for police forces and carceral institutions, and investing that money in programs, especially in Black communities, that support people’s well-being—things like schools, nutrition assistance, addiction treatment, social workers, and more. Our recommendation is to follow the lead of the Movement for Black Lives by calling to defund police forces and invest in communities; you can make a call to your local officials using our script here.

Make a Call to Defund the Police Now

In many marginalized communities, police and law enforcement represent harm and terror—not safety. When we defund police, we can invest in Black community-led education, health, and safety programs—funding for schools and youth homelessness services, solutions to the opioid crisis, and non-police responders for crises such as mental health response teams and community violence prevention programs. Make a call to your local officials now.

CALL NOW

What does it mean to defund the police?

UPDATE: In response to the murder of George Floyd and subsequent protests, a veto-proof majority of the Minneapolis City Council committed to dismantling the Minneapolis Police Department. Read more on how we got to this point and why Indivisible supports demands to defund the police.

In many communities, the police do not keep people safe. That was true well before the police murders that sparked the latest protests; policies like stop and frisk or “broken windows” policing demonstrate that in Black and brown communities, the role of the police is to surveil, threaten, and detain people in massive numbers, frequently without any cause or justification. This, in turn, means that members of these communities often feel they can’t call the police because they know that doing so could make the situation worse or even put their lives at risk. We need to step back from this broken model of “protection,” and reinvest in a shared vision of community safety, infrastructure, and recovery that does not rely on the police.

Police departments have massive budgets—often 30% or more of all the city’s spending in a given year—funds which are often used to criminalize unhoused people, respond to mental health crises and over police communities of color. That’s why local activists have been calling on their city officials for years to cut spending on police and invest that money instead into programs that serve the community’s needs, like housing assistance, clean water, mental health services, and more. Spending that much money on police, and increasing the amount that is spent every year, takes money out of priorities that can actually help keep people safer.

Take Washington, DC for example. According to the Washington City Paper, the city spent more on police and corrections in 2019 than it did on programs for jobs, young people, and mental health combined. Yet in this year’s budget, Mayor Muriel Bowser is proposing increasing the police budget and funding the construction of a new jail while cutting funding for the Office of Neighborhood Safety and Engagement, which provides violence intervention resources for communities. And this is despite the fact that there are clear problems with the DC police’s ongoing racist enforcement efforts, which began long before the recent protests.

All of this is on top of the centuries of violent and racist policies, like redlining, school closures, and over policing, that have extracted wealth from Black communities for the benefit of white communities. The police can’t solve problems that are rooted in social and economic injustice; only actively repairing the harms of those choices by investing in Black people and communities can do that.

There is a clear need to rebalance power between the police and the communities they are supposed to protect. We shouldn’t be handing out unlimited funding to local police departments that have proven over and over again that they are going to use that money to inflict violence on Black communities. Instead, we should call on our city leaders to cut funding for police departments, and use that money to invest in meeting Black and brown community’s needs. That means taking money out of police budgets to make sure people have well-funded schools, good living-wage jobs, affordable housing, and more.

Cities like Los Angeles and Minneappolis are already setting the course for what the steps look like to defund the police and reallocate funds into the community. The Minneapolis Public School System cancelled a long-standing contract and severed ties with the local police department—which will remove resource police officers from school campuses. Local Black Lives Matter and other activist groups called for a massive budget cut on the Los Angeles Police department earlier this year, with the recent protests and additional pressure on the Mayor a planned budget increase has been replaced with a $150 million cut to the budget. 

The idea of defunding the police might feel drastic at first. But the concept is simple—when we invest in community service programs we can reduce the need for police to respond to situations where their jobs aren’t applicable. The safest communities in America are places that don’t center the police, like wealthy predominantly white communities where people have easy access to wages, health care, good education, and freedom from police terror. The goal of this moment must be fighting for a new vision of what public safety looks like for Black communities who have never felt safe in this country. It’s important that our efforts meet the magnitude of that goal.

Support Racial Justice Organizations

Over the past week, righteous protests have erupted in the wake of George Floyd’s murder by a Minneapolis police officer. As protests stretch into their second week, organizations on the front lines of the work need all the support we can give them. This page will split your donation between organizations who are recognized as leading in Minnesota and nationwide.

DONATE NOW

Donate to Black-led organizations

At Indivisible, we believe Black Lives Matter without qualifications, asterisks, or caveats. We also belief in the right for communities to protest and protect themselves against state-sanctioned violence. 

To support Black activists fighting for justice, we recommend donating and supporting these local organizations, we’ve set up an ActBlue page where you can split a donation between leading local and national Black-led organizations.

Pursue anti-racist education

We also encourage Indivisibles to pursue their own anti-racist education. Here are a few resources we found helpful:

A note for social media: You’ll notice we didn’t link to video of any of these horrific incidents. That’s on purpose. Out of respect for those affected by these acts of violence, we urge readers not to continue sharing these traumatic videos and instead focus on lifting up the right voices, taking the right actions, and supporting the right organizations.

What can Congress and candidates do?

We need transformative change in our country—and there’s no silver bullet. But here are a few things that elected officials and candidates can do right now:

  • Demand your members of Congress end the 1033 program in the 2021 National Defense Authorization Act. The 1033 program grants authority to the Department of Defense to transfer defense materials and high grade weapons to local law enforcement agencies. These weapons are often used against Black and brown communities and, as we’ve recently seen, protestors. The NDAA is an annual must-pass piece of legislation, so we have a real chance to make this happen. Call your members of Congress and demand they end the 1033 program and prevent local law enforcement from getting their hands on dangerous weapons that could harm the public.
  • Ask your representative to co-sponsor the Omar-Pressley resolution (H.Res.988). Reps. Ilhan Omar (MN-5) and Ayanna Pressley (MA-7) have introduced a resolution in the House of Representatives condemning police violence. Call your representative and demand that they co-sponsor the resolution and speak out publicly about the need for the House to pass it without delay. You can check if your representative is already a co-sponsor here.
  • Ask your local, state, and federal officials to donate any police union campaign donations that they have received to bail funds and mutual aid organizations and to publicly commit to rejecting these funds in the future. Call, email, and tweet at them. (See this tweet from New York State Senator Mike Gianaris here)
    • Script: I am writing to you/calling as a concerned constituent who stands against police brutality and white supremacy. I am urging you to stand on the right side of history: refuse to take any political donations from police unions or sheriff associations and donate any contributions you have taken in the last year to Black-led community-strengthening initiatives. The continued violence against Black, brown, and Native communities at the hands of ‘law enforcement’ is disgraceful. Police unions are in the business of defending the most consistent murderers and abusers of the Black community, creating obstructions to justice for the families and loved ones. Stand with your community today.

 

How to More Safely Protest During a Pandemic

Tips for reducing the risk of spreading the coronavirus in a mass gathering, from public health experts (via Vox).

READ MORE

Protest safety

In light of everything that is happening right now, we know that some of you are anxious to show up in the best way that you can. In some instances, that might mean attending a local protest. With all of the safety concerns—from exposure to Coronavirus to the possible eruption of violence, this is a very personal decision. One that we are not advocating for one way or another. However, we do want to make sure, if you do decide to venture out to stand with your fellow activists, that you stay as safe as possible. With that said, we thought it would be beneficial to provide a few safety tips: 

The Anti Police-Terror Project has identified best practices for safety if you choose to attend in-person protests or events. Know the risks and do what you can to minimize the risk for you and those around you.

  1. If you’re feeling under the weather, you should reconsider attending the event for the safety of both yourself and others. 

  2. Wear a mask. And try to wear the most effective one that you have access to—if there ever was a time to wear a mask with a filter, this is it. Here’s a resource about the best types of homemade masks. 

  3. Bring extra masks and hand sanitizer for others at the protest that don’t have them.

  4. Maintain 6 feet of social distancing at all times

  5. Attend with a protest buddy. Stay together and have the National Lawyers Guild Legal Hotline 415-285-1011 written on your arm in case you are arrested. Let your buddy know who to contact if you are.

  6. Be aware of the health implications of being arrested, both for you and your community.

  7. If you are Black or Brown and are arrested, please let the National Lawyers Guild know when you call. The Anti Police-Terror Project has bail funds and will work through the night to get you home. 

  8. In some areas, breaking the Shelter In Place (SIP) order has serious legal implications—it can result in a misdemeanor, punishable by jail time or a large fine—in some cases $600 to $1000—that is selectively enforced. Know this and be aware of the consequences of being in the streets if you see cops writing tickets or closing in on you.

  9. If you are exposed to tear gas or mace, do NOT use water. That will likely only prolong the effects. 

  10. Follow your instincts and follow instructions. Keep yourself out of harm's way—if you see violence erupting, or feel uncomfortable, remove yourself from the area or situation immediately. And if police give orders, do your best to respectfully obey. 

We know that these are upsetting times and that we all want to be able to stand up and do something. This is not the world we want, this is not the world we’re working for. We’ll have more resources coming shortly about actions you can take from home, soon. Until then, please stay safe.